ASEAN SME

JAKARTA, 17 September 2014 – Key representatives from small and medium enterprise (SME) policy makers, ASEAN Small and Medium Enterprise Working Group (SMEWG), thinktanks, dialogue partners and multilateral organisations gathered at the ASEAN Secretariat on 12 September to exchange views, good practices and deliberate on the vision, mission and strategic goals for the Post-2015 Strategic Action Plan for SME Development (2016-2025) or SAP SMED.  
Building upon the policy workshop, participants reaffirmed the vision that“by 2025, ASEAN SMEs shall be globally competitive, resilient, and innovative which can seamlessly integrate into the ASEAN community and beyond for sustainable growth and equitable development in the region.”To achieve the 10-year vision, five areas of strategic goal were formulated namely: (i) enabling regulatory and institutional framework; (ii) enhancing access to finance; (iii) enhancing market access and internationalisation; (iv) strengthening entrepreneurial education and human capital development; and (v) promoting productivity, technology and innovation. 
For the next step, ASEAN SMEWG plans to convene a PublicPolicy Dialogue in November 2014, alongside the upcoming SMEWG meeting in Cambodia to obtain practical inputs and recommendations from the private sector – as the key stakeholders of the ASEAN Economic Community  - as well as relevant government and regulatory agencies in ASEAN Member States.
A series of events and activities in drafting Post-2015 SAP SMED has been conducted with support from AEM-METI Economic and Industrial Cooperation Committee of Japan, in coordination with the Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia, GIZ, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the United States Agency for International Development.

 

Source: http://www.asean.org/news/asean-secretariat-news/item/asean-smes-reaffirm-2025-vision


List of ASEAN Heritage Parks

NewImage

ASEAN Heritage Parks

 Brunei Darussalam

Tasek Merimbun Heritage Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Cambodia

Preah Monivong (Bokor) National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Virachey National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Indonesia

Gunung Leuser National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Kerinci-Seblat National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Lorentz National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

 Lao PDR

Nam Ha National Protected Area

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Malaysia

Kinabalu National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Gunung Mulu National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Taman Negara National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Myanmar

Alaungdaw Kathapa National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Indawgyi Lake Wildlife Sanctuary

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Inle Lake Wildlife Sanctuary

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Hkakaborazi National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Lampi Marine National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Meinmahla Kyun Wildlife Sanctuary

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Nat Ma Taung National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Philippines

Mt. Apo Natural Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Mts. Iglit-Baco National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Mt. Kitanglad Range Natural Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Mt. Malindang Range Natural Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Mt. Makiling Nature Reserve

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Singapore

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Bukit Timah Nature Reserve

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Thailand

Ao Phang-Nga – Mu Ko Surin – Mu Ko Similan National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Kaeng Krachan Forest Complex

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Khao Yai National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Tarutao National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile
 

 Viet Nam

Kon Ka Kinh National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Chu Mom Ray National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Ba Be National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

Hoang Lien Sa Pa National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

U Minh Thuong National Park

AHP Profile

Park Manager Profile

AHP Map

 

Source :aseanbiodiversity.org



ASEAN-Japan cooperation

NewImage

TOKYO, 5 September 2014 - The 29th ASEAN-Japan Forum was convened on 3-4 September 2014 in Tokyo to review ASEAN-Japan cooperation focusing on the progress of follow-up to the outcomes of the 16th ASEAN-Japan Summit and the ASEAN-Japan Commemorative Summit in 2013. In particular, the Meeting discussed ways to effectively implement the Vision Statement on ASEAN-Japan Friendship and Cooperation and its Implementation Plan, which aims to build four pillars of ASEAN-Japan Partnership, namely Partners for Peace and Stability, Partners for Prosperity, Partners for Quality of Life and Heart-to-Heart Partners. ASEAN and Japan would make full use of the existing resources, including the ASEAN-Japan Integration Fund 2.0, to support the realisation of these objectives.

On Partnership for Peace and Stability, the Meeting discussed ways to enhance cooperation on various areas such as non-proliferation and disarmament, counter-terrorism, cyber-crimes, maritime security, human rights, peace-keeping and peace-building. The Meeting stressed the need to strengthen ASEAN-Japan cooperation on addressing emerging trans-boundary challenges, such as transnational crimes, and looked forward to the adoption of a Joint Declaration for cooperation in the fight against terrorism and transnational crimes at the upcoming 17th ASEAN-Japan Summit in November.


ASEAN leader envisioned a better future

WE, the Heads of State/Government of Brunei Darussalam, the Kingdom of Cambodia, the Republic of Indonesia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, the Union of Myanmar, the Republic of the Philippines, the Republic of Singapore, the Kingdom of Thailand and the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam, Member Countries of ASEAN, on the occasion of the 12th ASEAN Summit in Cebu;

ACKNOWLEDGING the prescience of ASEAN Vision 2020 and the significant and important progress that ASEAN has made towards the goals of that visionary declaration;

RECALLING the proposal made at the 11th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur in December 2005, on accelerating the establishment of an ASEAN Community, as well as the exchange of views at the 39th ASEAN Ministerial Meeting in July 2006 in Kuala Lumpur and the recommendation from the 38th ASEAN Economic Ministers Meeting in August 2006;

RECOGNISING that different levels of development within ASEAN require some flexibility as ASEAN moves towards a more integrated and interconnected future;

WELCOMING the concrete outcomes of the First Coordinating Conferences for the ASEAN Security Community Plan of Action (ASCCO) and ASEAN Socio- Cultural Community Plan of Action (SOC-COM), as well as the Consultative Meetings for the Priority Integration Sectors (COPS) under the ASEAN Economic Community;

BUILDING UPON our commitment to the Vientiane Action Programme in November 2004 as successor to the Hanoi Plan of Action to realise the aims of ASEAN Vision 2020 and the Declaration of ASEAN Concord II, and welcoming the establishment of the ASEAN Development Fund in 2005 as a positive step towards integration;

EXPRESSING SATISFACTION with the progress towards narrowing the development gap under the Initiative for ASEAN Integration and other programmes and acknowledging the need to enhance efforts to achieve this goal;

DETERMINED to deal more effectively with the increasing range of transboundary concerns which ASEAN faces in this rapidly changing world since the articulation of Vision 2020 in 1997 and the Declaration of ASEAN Concord II in 2003 through better coordination and increased cooperation within ASEAN;

ENCOURAGED by ASEAN’s deepening relations with our Dialogue Partners in various areas including our FTA negotiations, comprehensive plans of action and the convening of the East Asia Summit, and our Dialogue Partners’ engagement of ASEAN as a reliable and substantive partner in the development of a larger community in the region;

CONSCIOUS also that the strengthening of ASEAN integration through the accelerated establishment of an ASEAN Community will reinforce ASEAN’s centrality and role as the driving force in charting the evolving regional architecture;

BELIEVING that at the core of ASEAN’s response to the increasing number of regional challenges must be its efforts to build a strong ASEAN Community premised on a closely integrated, dynamic and vibrant regional economy, deeper political and security cooperation and stronger socio-cultural linkages;

DO HEREBY DECLARE:

FIRST, ASEAN’s strong commitment towards accelerating the establishment of an ASEAN Community by 2015 along the lines of ASEAN Vision 2020 and the Declaration of ASEAN Concord II, in the three pillars of the ASEAN Security Community, ASEAN Economic Community and ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community;

SECOND, ASEAN’s strong determination to accelerate the full implementation of the ASEAN Community’s programme areas, measures and principles, with appropriate flexibility;

THIRD, ASEAN’s determination to create a stronger, more united and cohesive ASEAN that can better manage the challenges posed by the evolving regional architecture and economic climate; and

FOURTH, that ASEAN remains committed to further expanding our engagement with our Dialogue Partners and other parties, and believes that such interaction will assist ASEAN in its integration efforts to achieve the ASEAN Community by 2015.

DONE at Cebu, Philippines, this Thirteenth Day of January in the Year Two Thousand and Seven, in a single original copy in the English Language.


Vietnam Declaration of Independence

NewImage

Vietnam Independence day is a national holiday in Vietnam observed on September 2, commemorating the Vietnam Declaration of Independence from France on September 2, 1945. Best wish to the people of Vietnam and happy independance day.

Infomation about Vietnam

Capital Ha Noi
Land area 331,700 sq.km
Population 77.5 million (2000)
Language Vietnamese
Religion Buddhism, Christians
Member of ASEAN, IBRD, IDA, IFC, IMF, ASEM, MIGA, UNDP, UNCTAD, GSPT, UNIDO, FAO, IFAD, ICAO, EALAF
Currency Dong
GDP Dong 444,139 billion (2000) at current market prices
Major Industries Agriculture, forestry, fishery, industrial construction
Major Exports Crude oil, coal, chromium, tin, cements, woolen carpet, jute carpet, rice cinnamon, marine products
Major Imports Motors, petroleum products, diesel oil, fertilizers

Who is the member of ASEAN?

NewImage

1.Brunei Darussalam
Head of State : His Majesty Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah Mu’izzaddin Waddaulah
Capital : Bandar Seri Begawan
Language(s) : Malay, English
Currency : B$ (Brunei Dollar)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs & Trade of Brunei Darussalam Website: www.mfa.gov.bn

2.Cambodia
Head of State : His Majesty King Norodom Sihamoni
Head of Government : Prime Minister Hun Sen
Capital : Phnom Penh
Language : Khmer
Currency : Riel
Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Cooperation of Cambodia Website: www.mfaic.gov.kh

3.Indonesia
Head of State : President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
Capital : Jakarta
Language : Indonesian
Currency : Rupiah
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Indonesia Website: www.kemlu.go.id
Lao PDR
Head of State : President Choummaly Sayasone
Head of Government : Prime Minister Thongsing Thammavong
Capital : Vientiane
Language : Lao
Currency : Kip
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Lao PDR Website: www.mofa.gov.la

4.Malaysia
Head of Government : The Honourable Dato’ Sri Mohd Najib bin Tun Abdul Razak
Capital : Kuala Lumpur
Language(s) : Malay, English, Chinese, Tamil
Currency : Ringgit
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Malaysia Website: www.kln.gov.my
ASEAN-Malaysia National Secretariat Website: www.kln.gov.my/myasean
Myanmar
Head of State : President Thein Sein
Capital : Nay Pyi Taw

5.Language : Myanmar
Currency : Kyat
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Myanmar Website: www.mofa.gov.mm
Philippines
Head of State : President Benigno S. Aquino III
Capital : Manila
Language(s) : Filipino, English, Spanish
Currency : Peso
Department of Foreign Affairs of the Philippines Website: www.dfa.gov.ph

6.Singapore
Head of State : President Tony Tan Keng Yam
Head of Government : Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong
Capital : Singapore
Language(s) : English, Malay, Mandarin, Tamil
Currency : S$ (Singapore Dollar)
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Singapore Website: www.mfa.gov.sg

7.Thailand
Head of State : His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej
Head of Government :  Army Commander-in-Chief and Leader of the National Council for Peace and Order Gen Prayut Chan-O-Cha
Capital : Bangkok
Language : Thai
Currency : Baht
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand Website: www.mfa.go.th

8.VietNam
Head of State : President Truong Tan Sang
Head of Government : Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung
Capital : Ha Noi
Language : Vietnamese
Currency : Dong
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Viet Nam Website: www.mofa.gov.vn


What other measures have been put in place in support of trade liberalization under the AFTA?

Trade liberalization will not work well if tradefacilitation measures are not put in place. ASEANMember Countries have taken several steps in thisdirection. One, an ASEAN Harmonized TariffNomenclature will be implemented starting January2004. Two, work is also on-going on theharmonization of standards, conformity assessment,mutual recognition arrangements and simplificationof customs procedures.


What is The Common Effective Preferential Tariff? CEPT

The Common Effective Preferential Tariff (CEPT)Scheme is the main mechanism to move ASEAN towards the direction of the AFTA. It is a cooperative arrangement among the Member Countries whereby intra-regional tariffs will be brought down to within the 0-5% tariff band over a period of time,i.e. 2002 – ASEAN 6 (Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia,Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand);2006 – Viet Nam; 2008 – Lao PDR and Myanmar; 2010– Cambodia. Non-tariff barriers will also have to beeliminated under the CEPT Scheme.


AFTA contribution to ASEAN?

More than ten years of implementing the CEPT Scheme has resulted in the virtual realization of AFTAas the ASEAN 6 have 98.92% of all the products theytrade in the CEPT Inclusion List. Of these, 99.60% have tariffs within the 0-5% range. About 53.35% are levied zero tariffs.

The average CEPT rate for these countries has gonedown from 12.76% in 1993 to 2.39% as it currently stands. ASEAN’s new entrants – Cambodia, Lao PDR,Myanmar and Viet Nam – have 72.22% of all theirproducts in the CEPT Inclusion List and 60.64% ofthese have 0-5% tariffs.

AFTA has contributed a lot in the expansion ofMember Countries’ trade, ASEAN and non-ASEAN alike. Statistics available at the ASEAN Secretariat would show that from 1993, total ASEAN trade increased by 64.38% or from US$ 429.9 billion toUS$ 706.7 billion. Intra-ASEAN trade grew even much faster, i.e. by 93.6% or from US$ 82.4 billion to US$ 159.5 billion.